Facebook PPC Ads: Is a Picture Worth a Thousand Clicks? « The Blog of Matthew Loop

Facebook PPC Ads: Is a Picture Worth a Thousand Clicks?

When it comes to Facebook PPC advertising, the image is quite possibly the most important part of your ad. It can also the toughest thing to get approved. If the picture is too sexy or risqué, then chances are it will be rejected. Facebook doesn’t approve nudity, hateful images or highly obscene pictures.

The Right Image

The Internet is an image-based medium. That does not mean that copy is not important.

What it does mean is that photos, artwork, or graphic designs make an immediate first impression that can make people want to see more… or that can simply make them turn to something else.

Thus, you want to find the image that will capture people’s attention.

Here are some key points towards finding that picture that will help make sure your Facebook PPC advertising ten times more effective.

1) The image should be attractive and tasteful

2) Sometimes UGLY, in-your-face images work very well, too

3) Ideally the image should be connected to your product / service

4) Active images work well

5) Sometimes symbols or images that generate curiosity work

6) The image can define a specific feeling or moment

7) Advertising is emotional which means your image needs to make people want to see more

Here are a few examples to clarify these points.

Advertise a vacation spot with an inviting picture of the area such as a pristine beach caressed by gentle waves.

Capture people’s attention to exercise products with a fit-bodied person working out

Advertise men’s formal wear with a handsome groom in a tux

If you’re selling flowers, then show a gorgeous bouquet and the happy young woman receiving it

Sell grills with a picture of a guy cooking a great steak on one

Show fantastic looking apples on a tree if you’re peddling fresh fruit

Make people want to click through to your site and opt-in / purchase your product by using a striking visual image that defines your product through look, experience and emotion.

Pictures sell; it’s that simple.

Essential Words

Copy is very important too with Facebook PPC advertising. You’re allowed 135 characters and how you use them will help ensure that the right people click through to your site. One way to make sure than you’re attracting potential buyers is by listing the price on your advertisement.

As an example, let’s say that you’re selling weight sets and your minimum set costs $400. Listing that price will exclude those who won’t pay that price from clicking through and costing you money. You don’t want to attract buyers who won’t spend more than $200 when you have nothing cheaper than $400.

The Final Word

The final word or phrase on Facebook PPC advertising is the “call to action.” Include one in your advertisement. You want people to act on your ad and so include the words that will entice them to do so. Imply scarcity, too.

Finding an appropriate image is the first step towards ensuring that your Facbook ad generates clicks that will get people to your site. Make sure that your photo is eye-catching, curiosity evoking, tasteful and connected to your product or service.

Did you like this post? If so, click the Facebook “like” button below and share it with your friends!

Also, visit this link to get the replay of my widely publicized Facebook Ads marketing blueprint teleseminar. It’s 2 hours jam-packed with everything you need to know to get profitable quick using Facebook ppc.

Related Blog Posts:

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How to Add your Facebook Fan Page to your Personal Profile


About the Author

Matthew Loop is an author, speaker, philanthropist, and the highest paid social media revenue strategist in North America. He helps brands, startups, celebrities, and small business owners multiply their influence, impact, and income by harnessing the power of the Internet. Connect with him on Instagram, Twitter and Google+.

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